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of the international community but fully engage with the international community and the united states is the one who can do the heavy lifting. there is no question about that. >> rose: and john harris of gives us a one-year analysis of the oa administration. >> the idea that president obama and his team were able to somehow transform the map and transform the political geography of this country or the political demography of this country, that just doesn't look to be the case. they did redraw the map in 2008. it was an he norly impressive victory. but that doesn't mean that they have somehow fundamentally altered the landscape in permanent ways. >> and job grisham is here with a new book, a collection of short stories. >> it is more about people. more about the small town people. many of whom are struggling. many of whom have had a lot of miss erie, a lot of hope. it's about small town lawyers and the crazy things they do out of desperation. all stuff i saw firsthand many years ago. >> rose: mohamed elbaradei, john harris, john grisham next. >> funding for charlie rose has been provid
years between iran and the united states in geneva last month. he is now involved in the draft agreement between iran, the united states, russia and france to process iran's uranium stockpiles outside the country. there are reports today that progress on the deal is being held up by iran's ongoing internal political crisis. this week dr. elbaradei called the current mont a unique and fleeting opportunity to reverse course from confrontation to cooperation with iran. we want to talk about all of that and i am very pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. >> charlie, it is great to be here again. >> rose: all right. let me just start. tell me where you think the moment is. >> well, the moment is a historic critical moment, charlie, that this is for the first time i see a genuine desire by the president of the united states and by the iranian leadership to engage in a genuine dialogue. it's after 50 years of animosity, of distrust. and that's why we have this difficulty today. the it is a symbolic gesture but it could be the first step in a broad dialogue that eventually could integ
to assume and they don't like having all the pressure brought on by the united states to ratchet up the level of chinese obligation. >> rose: also this evening, french chef eric ripert of the famous new york restaurant la bernadine. >> so when i came to new york, we're talking about 20 years ago. i came with a very french way of seeing food with a very strong mediterranean influence and then i discovered japanese cuisine. i discovered chinese cuisine, i went to brooklyn and visit the stores where they have all the spices. i traveled throughout the u.s. and interact with many other chefs from other cultures. i discovered south america. i went to japan. and all of that is ultimately digested and comes back in the kind of... i call that smart fusion. >> rose: a look at china and the united states in the after math of the presidential visit and food through the skills of eric ripert next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: this evening we continue our coverage of president obama's visit to china. earlier today he
the united states' mission and its allies' mission going forward? >> in the larger sense, of course, the mission really depends on a great deal more than just corruption, although that is certainly a concern here. mcchrystal, i think, is prepared now to accept some redefinition of what the counterinsgency strategy is going to be. that is doing the same with fewer troops or narrowing the mission somewhat. but, again, president karzai, it seems to me, is really of the opinion that the united states is really stuck with them and that his election has given the united states no real alternative. therefore, he has the latitude to really take this as a rate of change that he would like and one that we probably would not like. >> what's the blueprint here? >> the blueprint essentially is to be able to do the basics of what counterinsurgency requires and that is to be able to protect large population centers and to devote most of our energies now into regaining the confidence of the afghan people. unfortunately, karzai's actions in recent times, not just corruption, but failure to deliver b
to be very important. but the biggest thing is the united states is going to do well. i mean, we can't move the railroad to china or india. they haven't figured out how to do that. so sort of like the song of new york-- we have to make it here or we can't make it anywhere. >> rose: frank sinatra. >> but it does move move a ton of good 470 miles on one gallon of diesel. a train replaces 280 trucks on the road. it emidst far less into the atmosphere that's damaging than trucking, and it moves-- i'm talking about the whole rail industry-- it moves 40% of the good. >> rose: and you have new ports of entry like houston. >> and we're going to have more people in this country and they're going to be using more kdz gdz over time. sure, there's a bad year from time to time. in the next 100 years there will probably be 15 bad years and i don't know what order they'll appear but i know the railroads will be essential. >> rose: when you called charlie munger and said i'm thinking about this, did he say right on warren? >> if charlie said right on warren, i would figure it would be a wrong number. that
, iseally of the opinion th the united states is really stuck with them a th the election hasiven the unitedtates no real alternate. therefore, he s the latitude to really take this as a rate of change that he would likand e that we pbably would not like. what's the blueprint here? >> t blueprint essential to be ale to the basicsf what counterinrgency requires d that is to be ableo protect largeopulation centers and to devote most of our energi now into regaining the coidence of the afghan people. unfortately, karzai's actions in recent times, not just corrupon, butfailure to delirbasic services are real what is forfeit so much of the cfidence and the trus that t afghan people are going to need if our strategy isoing to succeed. >>nd just vy briey, a lot of theeports about the wte house strate meeting say that esident obama is insisting that theree aay out before committing more troops. do you think that that is realistic? >> i really believe that that's a long shot here, that anyone is going to be able to script just what kind ofa way out. but it certainl may be a necessary part
missions to the united states in 1926, he committed an act of violence, and attempted murder in los angeles and was incarcerated in san quentin prison. this becomes a very crucial question as to the veracity of his famous book, "our of the night," in 1941, when eventually appears. immediately it had the following effect on him: krebbs became one of the editors and contributors to the san quentin prisoners magazine. he took lots of extension courses in writing from the university of california and at that point he determined to become a writer. he got all of san quentin in 1929, was deported, went back to europe and got caught up again and communist activities. according to him, he was thrown into jail by the nazis from which he escaped by the following routt: he converted to nazism, the nazis let him out so he could go out and be as it were a double agent for his former communist allies. they, however, didn't think there was anything phony about his -- about his conversion. and under these circumstances, he said he chased by the secret police, both of russia and of germany. he took off wi
be said you would save for a man who combined a career as commander in chief of the united states army, and that was how congress does it made him commander in chief with his second existence as agent 13 in the spanish secret service. 11 years he commanded the nations forces, he dowson its forces, patrolled its frontiers and for most of that time, he also said america's military secrets to the largest power in the hemisphere. and if spain had acted a little more vigorously on the warnings of agent passed on they would have carried the lewis and clark expedition and put a halt to the expedition. and they did heed his advice about fortifying the border with texas and so they kept the united states out of texas for about a generation things to his warnings he was a pretty effective agent it has to be said. and then there is also his reputation as the man who founded the spanish conspiracy, and the spanish conspiracy was designed to split away kentucky and tennessee from the rest of the country. so a guy like that, you know, he makes snakes seem like a model of rectitude and chameleons, ch
to you first, what is the single biggest challenge for the president of the united states when he speaks to the united states, ed rollins? >> how long we're going to be there and equally as important what is the mission and how is the mission different than it was two years ago or four years ago. dechl democrats have to be convinced the president's party is very divided on this issue. i think he'll have the republican support he needs, but at the end of day, if this is not a bipartisan effort long-term they won't get the resources and funding to make it work. >> donna brazile, to ed rollins' point, the toughest sales job is the anti-war left of the democratic party. how does the president convince them to support him or keep quiet of the criticism? >> public support of the war has diminished across the board not just with the left, across the country and even across the world where we depend on troops from other countries to help us in afghanistan. the president gave a very thorough speech back in march, laying out our objectives. he said it was to dismantle, disrupt and destroy al qaeda
who combined a career as commander in chief of the united states army and that's how congress designated him commander in chief with his second existence as agent 13 in the spanish secret service. 11 years he commanded the nation's forces. he garrisoned its forts and patrolled the forests. and at the same time he fed the military secrets to the largest power in the hemisphere and if spain had acted a little more vigorously on the warnings that agent 13 passed on they would have captured the lewis and clark expedition and put a halt to their westward exploration. and they did heed his advice about fortifying the border with texas and so they kept the united states out of texas for about a generation thanks to his warning. so he was a pretty effective agent. it has to be said. and then there's also his reputation as the man who founded the spanish conspiracy and the spanish conspiracy was designed to split away kentucky and tennessee from the rest of the country. so a guy like that, you know, he really makes sort of snakes seem like a model of good and chameleons look good compa
of the united states to take a look at your antitrust exemption. york $8 billion organization has not taken seriously responsibility to the players. a fact of the matter is, if yes, people want to play. they are going to be injured and we know that no matter what kind of helmet you build, no matter what kind of equipment that you have, it is a dangerous sport. people are going to be injured. the only question is, what you going to do -- are you going to pay the injured player and their family for the injuries that they have received and how can you be a multi-billion operation? se profits, but i think the responsibility of this congress is to take a look at that anti--trust exemption that you have. in my estimation, take it away. i yield back the balance of my time. >> i thank the gentlewoman for her modest suggestions. [laughter] the chair recognizes howard from north carolina. >> thank you, mr. chairman. what does the alumni association have to say to active pro, college and high school players about the importance of early and completely presenting to team physicians any sims that may ha
telling the president of the united states no, i don't even want olympia snowe, i'd want one republican supporting health care bill? >> the truth is -- i'm going to disagree right now. free enterprise does not work particularly well in health care and i will tell you why. the administration rate -- >> we don't have insurance companies competing across state lines 3 >> that's the worst thing you could do. >> are you kidding me? >> yes. i will explain why this is. in my state, everybody under 18 has health care. you cannot be refused by any insurance company, no matter what the reason is. everybody gets charged the same. you cannot charge a sick patient who is older more than 20% more than you can charge a young, healthy patient. that has been going on for 15 years. if you could let people buy insurance across state lines, you are making the texas health commissioner be my health commissioner. do you know what the insurance rate is in in texas? 25%. 22% of children have no health insurance in texas. i do not want health commissioner in texas to have anything to do with my health insurance
, it was six world powers that made a move today. delegates from the united states, britain, france, germany, russia and china met in brussels, belgium, and turned up the heat on iran. they didn't discuss the sanctions, not yet anyway, but that possibility served as a backdrop for today's meetings. the issue is iran's nuclear ambitions. tehran says its uranium enrichment program is for peaceful purposes only, but other countries worry it gives iran the capability of making an atomic bomb. despite some optimism in recent weeks, iran now seems to be rejecting a plan to have its uranium enriched outside the country. the delegates in brussels urged iran to reconsider, and hence the talk by president obama and others this week about the possibility of new sanctions. what kind of measures and when, that is our "lead focus" tonight. weeks after iran disclosed the existence of this once-secret nuclear facility near the holy city of qom, in brussels today representatives of the world's major powers pressed iran to accept a plan to curb its nuclear ambitions. the six countries released this statement
think if you add up the troops that the united states will commit as well as those that nato countries are going to commit and that's still a work in progress on the latter. i'm told by senior defense officials that general mcchrystal will be more or less satisfied with the number that he believes he needs to do the counterinsurgency campaign that he laid out in his strategic assessment earlier this year. >> suarez: now, it takes a while to get everybody deployed, doesn't it? >> it does. it will take several months, actually several weeks for the first troops. but the marines that you mentioned will be going in first early next year to be followed soon after by a number of... several hundred perhaps up to a thousand army trainers. these will be doing the initial training of afghan recruits. the recruits will then be put into their units and partnered with american units on the ground. this will be a phased deployment going over the next 12 to 18 months. the troops that you mention in your broadcast, up to some 30,000 or so will be phased in over that time frame. >> suarez: once all tho
it from europe, you see it from the united states and you see it from asia. tell me what you see. >> well, i see a very different situation. in europe there is no recovery and i think 2010's going to be a mediocre year in europe. same thing in japan. we don't see any recovery. we see resistance to the decline but no recovery. in the united states, things look more promising for the short term. you know, after a very large chop in the economy and particularly in the automobile industry. >> rose: but generally those impressions you just said are about the economy overall. >> yeah, but the economy overall we see slight growth in 2010. but a situation very different from one country to the other. >> rose: at what point in an economic recovery do consumers think about automobiles? >> well, you know, it depends where the consumer is. if he's in china or in brazil or india, he's thinking all the time about automobiles. what's the best opportunity? what's the best deal? and we're seeing these sales booming all the time. you know, no matter what. now, in that time, you have an increase of 5% or 10
is the optimal solution to provide necessary medical treatment to everyone and the united states in a way that controls health care costs. pnhp doesn't, however, take a position on how congress members should vote on the legislation that is currently proceeding for congress. we do provide information to members about whether the legislation is likely to be ctive, and how icompes to a national single payer health care system. we joined the many health care reform advocates across the nation who are disappointed by the health insurance reform legislation that is passing through congress. we, like you, are seriously concerned by the health care environment in the united states. we are saddened by the number of people, our patience, family and friends who are donner and because they cannot receive or for access to health care. we are saddened by the number of people facing bankruptcy or foreclosure of their homes and those who are suffering needlessly because they cannot afford or have access to medical treatment. the anticipated a health care debate this year that would focus on the trees st
that there are 200 million jews and the world and israel is half the size of europe. it is not. the united states and canada are roughly 400 times each the size of israel. the arab world is 500 times the size of israel. egypt alone is roughly the 40 times the size of israel. and even a small country like jordan, our neighbor to the east, is almost four times as big. israel is bigger than rhode island. [laughter] that is about it. [laughter] now, mind you, small countries are not necessarily insecure. belgium and luxembourg are small, but today they are not insecure. if their neighbors included radical regimes bent on their conquest, bent on their destruction, it they fell the -- if they feel that terror proxy's that fire thousands of missiles on their population, believe me, they too would feel insecure. anybody would. because of our small size and the radical and violent neighborhood in which we live, israel faces security threats like that of no other nation. here are two facts from recent days alone that will drive this point home. a few days ago, the israeli navy it predicted that the ship ca
of the united states, peace can become a reality. [applause] we can surprise a skeptical world. achieving peace is a great challenge facing israel. at the un in september, i spoke of another great challenge. preventing iran from developing a nuclear weapons capability. the iranian regime tyrannizes its people, sponsors and supplies terrorists and openly pledges to wipe israel off the map. just imagine how much more dangerous this regime would be it had atomic bombs. the responsible members of the international community must unite to prevent this grave threat to the pace of the entire world. i support president obama's continued efforts towards these ends. i appreciate the firm position taken by the leading european governments. we must not succumb to the iranian regime's cutting into its to see. we must stand together to stop tehran from realizing its nuclear ambitions. in addition to achieving peace, and to preventing a nuclear iran, there is a third momentous challenge before us. reducing the world's dependence on oil. this would help cleanse our world after more than a century of industrial
.s. secretary of state, secretary of war, and finally, to term president of the united states, the fifth president. as governor of virginia he became the second most powerful figure in america. virginia then was america's largest, wealthiest and heavily populated state with 20% of the american population. it stretched all the way to the mississippi river and all the way north to the great lakes. it was enormous and the prestige and its importance of the governor was akin to the governors of california, illinois, new york and texas put together. and monroe was not only governor of america's most important state, he was a national hero in the revolutionary war. in other words he was a giant in his day and i don't understand why historians ignore him which is why i wrote this book to restore him to his rightful place in american history as the most important president in the early days of the nation. now some historians elevate john adams to historical prominence and most historians deify thomas jefferson and james madison and these were three great founding fathers and great political phil
of the united states military who americans looked to. >> we need not look forth past for greatness, because it is before our very eyes. >> he said it was a trying time, a time of war but not one where the military's victory would be marked by a simple ceremony. >> in a world of threats that know no borders, their legacy will be marked in the security and opportunity that's extended abroad. >> he said it was hard to comp end this twisted logic that led to this tragedy. >> nothing justifies these acts no just and loving god looks upon them with favor. for what he has done, we know that the killer will be met with justice in this world and the next. >> the man accused. major ma leak hassan is out of a coma but refusing to comment. >> here at f.b.i. headquarters in washington they are defending themselves against the charge they should have raised the alarm before about major hassan, he had been in touch with one who advocates terrorism. but the f.b.i. says the emails between the two men were benine either about the major's psychiatric research or asking for advice social. >> it's something th
trafficking is actually done out of the prison system in the united states. particularly the california prison system. and he mentioned one prison, pelican bay, in specific. and then i came back, and i found that there are all these cell phones in prisons which enables a group, name live the mexican mafia, to essentially use cell phones to give directives right out of prisons on hits, on territories, on dealers, and i think this is a very serious thing. i've introduced legislation that would make cell phones contraband in federal prisons with possession punishable by up to an additional year in prison. what do you think of this? what are you doing? it is a real problem, mr. attorney general. >> it is a real problem, senator. i had experience with that when i was the united states attorney here in washington, d.c. rapel edmonds was convicted, sent to jail and continued to run his drug enterprise from prison, was convicted again for that. the maintenance of cell phones in prison, i think, is unacceptable and i think we have to find ways in which we conif i skate them. you're right, they ought to
it was a cole of hdred ars ago until the 19th amendmen, half the unite states wast entitled to do mu. we have a great syste >> rose: what's happened the st of the world, especially china and india and aces like that,ave grown and have enormous pottial now and that are growing faster than we are. >> that's rrific. >> rose: that's terrific? it mea the pie's bigger? >> sure. the rld is not a zer sum game. i mean, if we had our choice of being an land of psperity in a world of 6.5 billion people, most of whom were struggng, or being the same country with other people prosping, the tter is much the better choice particularly in e nuclear world pup don't want billions of people with nucar capacity envying you and feeling somehow you've gotten al the goodiesf the worl we will growslower relative t a china significaly slower, but they're starting fro a much lower base. >> rose: mid-century they' have a larger economy than we will. >> it will be a lo time. >> rose: you don't bieve that, though? >> large or a per-capita basis. >> rose: i mea a larger growth economy. >> if ey have four times as many p
full circle to what we're doing here today in this important g-8 in the capital of the united states. i feel that a failure to articulate a meaningful, a global jewish identity is the biggest threat currently facing the jewish people. [applause] i want to see our people united, joined by global destiny and mission. a small people, but one that is influential and critical to civilization. we are all here today because ugc, the jewish federations of north america, had created a remarkable network with another organization where we can have communications about identity globally and envision tomorrow and create a stronger jewish future. when we do we can deal with the gall stones -- lies and forgeries. i think in this city they are fond of the expression "yes, we can," but this will take board. do not let this be simply a place for schmooze and catch up with friends and colleagues. we have a larger agenda to address. we must be a think tank to create a vision of jewish people for this century. we're here to create a division. who could have imagined that the jew would one day run at one of
least pentionflict i mean war but i mean in terms of strategic conflict with e united states which is right now th primy power i asia. d getso veryarge queson, charlie you asd before. how do we deal with this kind of china? 're gointo have a big deba in this country. it already under way. it will get more intense. do we try to contain china? e see i as we sawstal's viet u or mao's china? do we eko engage it? >> we do wanto engage china and in a the issues tt have been set out in th misting. but i also think theese chin will talk us to death. and before this summit i was down in wash aington an administration officl said "the truth is, they dot wan to cooperate on anything." and so i ink in additioto our continued efforts... >> rose: they don't want to cooperate on anything? >> exactly. >> rose: they have no interest in currency reform. they have no interest in climate change. they have no interest in... >>s that' why you see... >> in nick burn's friend rober zell leg in being a responsible stakholder? >> rht, thk that's why you see the rt of hoe level delivebles. and it may be too
% below 2005 levels as the target. host:: ñ were other countries waiting to hear from the united states? guest: absolutely, turn it came out the day after. they had been clearly waiting. -- china came out the day after. they had been clearly waiting. host: what are the5 sticking points in the negotiation? guest: there are two things. what is the target that was set last week. the other is the financing. there was an agreement with developing companies that would take actions in return for financing from the wealthier nations. we have taken care of the target. we have stepped up with the target and now we need to step up on the financing side. host: it was stated last week, president obama has set goals to reduce emissions and you were quoted as saying that the president is walking a nice edge. can you expand on that? guest: he is in a very narrow space. on the one hand, he had to take a stand that would encourage india and china that we would, in fact, take a stand. and he also led to do it in a way that would not hurt his chances with congress. for 12 years, congress has been asking fo
earlier today with regards to iran's human rights violations. the united states welcomes the resolution passed today by the united nations calling upon the government of iran to comply. the resolution expresses deep concerns of the iranian authorities to peaceful demonstrations in the wake of the election. we call on iran to abolish any executions including stoning carried out without due process of law. the resolution calls on them to cooperate fully with and admit entry to the un members. the special group on the green peppers and promotion and protection, the group on human rights defenders, portrayed the invention, and forced or involuntary disappearance. i will issue the full statement after the briefing. this is the largest vote margin on such a resolution on iran in the un ever. over 60% of members voted in support. with that, i will happily take your questions. >> the statement said they took stock of recent events. was there no discussion about the way ahead at this meeting? >> i think the political records wanted to take a look at their responses, or lack thereof, to a number
? >> i think there is a list, a long list, of countries over a period of time that the united states and the president will host as visitors and guest here, but i think what came about with this one, this is 810-year relationship -- 810-year relationship. over 10 years, there has really been an important partnership in reaching out on the part of president clinton, on the part of president bush, to really solidified this important strategic relationship. there is so much -- this is the largest democracy in the world, india is. we are the second-largest democracy. there is an important relationship that needs to be nurtured and continue. the national security advisers of the president -- have said that he should which it will recommend others that he should host. and ultimately, that will be his decision. >> we heard earlier that this is the first lady's show. when does the first lady's office began preparing for a state dinner? >> this dinner, likely, or this visit started right at the time that secretary clinton hand- deliver the invitation from president obama to prime minister sin
to the contrary. demjanjuk was deported from the united states in maynd is chged with being an accessory to the murder o almost 28,000 jews at a nazi death cam in poland. the trial, as you n imane, is major story in germany and drew survors of the holaust who are coinced of demjanjuk's ilt, as we hear in this repo from our german partner deutsche welle. >> reporter: the past still haunts him. he spent 11months at auswitz. his parents and s brother were killed in the death campn sobibor. heas traveledto munich from his home in the netherlands. he's among 30 who will b attending the trl. ere's no doubt in his mind that john demjanjuk is guilty, and he wants to see him convicted. >> translator: i makes no dierence whether he's 9 years old 90. he did it. was there. i can' say whether he mdered my parents, but he was involved in their killing. >> reporter: demjanjuk has consistently dend ever being at sobibor. one of the toughest challenge cing prosecor will be to answer the question surrounding the identity of the 89-year-old. questionthat may never be answed. in 1988,he wasentenced to deat
on a conservation issue. britain, france, united states have all called for a ban on this, the trade in bluefin tuna. and that could leave japan's sushi restaurants without their star attraction. t for bluefin, time is running out. unless rampant overfishing is curbed very soon, these predators of the sea, the equivalent of lions and tigers, will simply vanish. >>> now, let's switch gears. we're going to meet some people who have devoted their lives to their passions for food, or as you'll see in our next story, why. lebanon is not the top country that you would think of in developing great wines. but the bekaa valley has a history going back to an current times. today the wine business is thriving there once again and attracting newcomers as christen gillespie found on a wine road less traveled. >> reporter: it's spring, and that means pruning season for the vineyards of this village in the mountains about an hour east of beirut. it's also the home of chateau bellview, the award winning winery that debuted three years ago. these two opened the winery in part to rebuild this christian village that w
's. >>> the day at the data states voiced its concern -- the day after the united states voiced its concern about israel bulldozing homes, washington had sharply rebuked israel for plans for 900 new homes in the largely arab region. according to president obama, it could lead to a very dangerous situation. it >> 30,000 people already live here. israel is building new homes and says it will continue to do so. they see it as part of their capital, jerusalem. this is east jerusalem, part of land that israel captured in a war more than 40 years ago under international law. they're not supposed to build on occupied land. as long as it does, say palestinians, they will not restart the stalled peace talks. the palestinian prime minister voiced frustration with the stalled peace process and the is -- and the israeli expansion of settlements. >> it is a question of settlement policy. there is no such thing. there is no such thing when it comes to settlement activity. it either its stops completely or does not stop. >> not israel's building plans have provoked anger and concern across the international com
, born in the united states, a jordanian presence. they are wondering whether he was a crazed gunmen, or whether the u.s. army major had been radicalized by the war's his country is fighting overseas. at the mosque where his -- where he worshipped, a friend disagrees. >> he was a gentleman. very soft-spoken. he was immature. anyone who knew him, they liked him. he liked everybody. i never saw him getting into religious or political conflicts. he was not a loner. >> here, at home, the story ahead. >> we were taken on to the base today, and we talked to one of the soldiers on the same. >> gunshots everywhere. people were trying to move to get to ambulances. >> what are you doing? >> trying to help triage. >> the u.s. is all too familiar with mass shootings, but this one takes place at a particularly acute place and time. it raises a crucial question -- was this the work of a disturbed individual or something more sinister than that? the gunman is in hospital under armed guard. here, they want answers from him, and quickly. matthew price, bbc news, fort hood, texas. >> another shooting
had been shot by hasan. he is a buzz -- he's a muslim born in united states, of born of jordanian presence. they are wondering whether he had been radicalized by the wars in this country is fighting overseas. >> we were taken on to the base today, just after they lifted the lockdown, and here we spoke to one of the first soldiers on the scene. >> you have people trying to move, trying to triage. >> what were you doing? >> just trying to help to secure, things like that. you had so many people moving. >> at the same time, medics and nurses were rushing to help. one colonel told us they saved many lives. >> you could write books about how they took care of these patients. the were lots of lives saved because of my nurses and techs exactly what you do and they did it well. >> police came and went, saying little about the investigation. the suspected gunman is in hospital under armed guard. the army wants answers, and quickly. matthew price, up bbc news, fort hood, texas. >> there has been another shooting in the u.s., this time in an office building in orlando, florida. the gunman ha
was not my intention to doubt that the doctrines of the illuminati had not spread in the united states. on the contrary. no one is more truly satisfied of this fact than i am. and what about the great seal of the united states found on our $1 bill? >> the great seal has two sides. the first side is the eagle side, which carries the olive branches and the arrows and the not toe, e pluribus unum. the reverse side has the pyramid, the eye in the triangle, and we kept this above the eye in the triangle, and that means god, and underneath it means the new order of the ages. sean: conspiracy theorist say it's latin for new secular order, since that is what they believe the illuminati are secretly trying to create, a new world order. >> it's not a new secular order. the person that put it on the seal was a latin scholar. he knew exactly what he was saying -- the new order of the ages, the ages of republicanism rather than a monarchy. >> and the symbol in the eye on the tringl or the all-seeing eye, as it is also known, can be traced back to egyptian mythology. today it is commonly linked to g
intention to doubt that the doctrines of the illuminati had not spread in the united states. on the contrary. no one is more true of this fact than i am." and what about the great seal found on our one dollar bill? >> the great seal has two sides. the first side is the eagle side that carries the olive branches and the arrows. the second side, the reverse side, is perhaps the more mystical side, has the pyramid, the eye in the triangle, and we kept this above the eye in the triangle and that means god's pros speakers our undertaking. and the words mean the new order of the ages. >> conspeerty theorists argue that the words is latin for new leka lar order since that is what they believed the illuminati are secretly trying to do, a new world order >> it's not a new secular order. the person to about put it on there was a latin scholar. he knew exactly what he was saying, the new order of the ages. the ages of republicanisms, rather than a monarchy. >> and the symbol on the eye on the triangle can be traced back to egyptian mythology. today it is also commonly linked to groups such as the illum
. that goal, of course, was never achieved. today the united states and its allies remain entrenched in the conflicts in afghanistan and iraq. in the united states and europe and beyond, those who have served and sacrificed were remembered and honored. the day also brings into sharp focus the growing hardships faced by many veterans. in toad focus," we are going to look extensively at the memories and the scars of war. we begin our coverage with the british perspective from itn's rags martel. ♪ >> reporter: for 90 years the sacrifice of the first world war has been remembered. this year is different. the first armistice day without any veterans of the great war. the last three of its soldiers, henry allingham, harry patch and william stone, died earlier this year. >> neither the last of his comrades in arms has gone to his eternal rest, we are here once more to remember. >> reporter: and at the 11th hour, silence, around britain and the world. [ bell tolls ] ♪ >> reporter: at westminster abbey, the flag used to cover the bodies of the fallen during the first world war hung above
service and the united states attorney in that area. >> just a follow-up on april's questi question. >> her question was a follow-up. >> a triple follow on, the social office knows the list -- >> sheryl -- >> they would have overheard the couple announce themselves and it wouldn't have required a phone call. it wouldn't have -- they would have flagged it right away. would it not -- >> if the couple wouldn't have come it wouldn't have required a phone call. >> that's true, too. >> i understand, and -- and generally when people have questions, sheryl when you have a question, april, when you have a question, i don't have to be there in person to answer your question despite the fact that you may announce your question. generally you can pick up the telephone and reach me right there in my office. >> the press secretary robert gibbs getting pounded with some serious questions there. let's bring in our senior white house correspondent ed henry once again. ed, you had your own questions for the press secretary. were they answered? >> reporter: well, not exactly. i mean, what you heard ro
. >> we are already working with the government of the united states of america on securing the state of the iraqi borders. second, what my colleague will lott said that is he has a selective way of choosing things. we have a long list of statements by u.s. generals and iraq, on the record, and we will give you the names. send me an e-mail that will give you my card right now. i want to be a long list of official, on the occurred quotations by top-ranking american journalists in iraq saying that of -- top-ranking american generals and direct saying that of course the worst problem of the insurgents in iraq, but they did not come to more than 2% or 3% of the total number of insurgents in iraq. . mainly homegrown. do we allow them to cross into iraq to? of coarse we don't. regardless of public statements i'm sorry i can't disclose everything, but i will say it this way. we are actually working with the obama administration decision. we are working with the u.s. military on this issue. "-begin-double-quote we've be there. people always try to tell you misinformation or disinformation, in
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